Hi John, thanks for your comment. Hardly a smoking gun, but nonetheless, I have a gut feeling that if the drink were to be studied, it would turn out to be the Peganum Harmala / Acacia concoction you mention. His paper, Biblical Entheogens: a Speculative Hypothesis (which can be read here) draws on the similarities between the ayahuasca experience and important moments in Moses’ life. In South American indigenous cultures there is an oral tradition surrounding ayahuasca use; in ancient Indian texts a specific visionary substance is mentioned (Soma in the Vedic texts), and in the ancient Aztec religion we find mentions of teonanactal (“flesh of the gods”), as well as statues and art depicting mushrooms. The Burning Bush Hallucination Moses was tripping when he saw the burning bush and received the Ten Commandments, according to Benny Shanon, a professor of cognitive psychology at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. That burning bush may very well have been a sort of acacia tree which allowed Moses his Revelations ☺. The third episode was the famous moment at Mount Sinai when God handed down the Ten Commandments to Moses. This blog is intended to be a collection of interesting ideas and personal reflections. We don’t even know who wrote the Bible or when it was written. Shanon argues that the people in that area had access to the same chemicals (DMT + MAOI) which are found in ayahuasca and that they had visionary experiences through combining and ingesting them. The only evidence for Moses’ existence is from the Bible itself, which unfortunately cannot be considered a reliable form of evidence due to its historical inaccuracies, inconsistencies and unrealistic claims. While his hypothesis is no doubt interesting and seems to offer an explanation of the strange episodes in the Bible, I do not think that there is enough compelling evidence to support it. Somewhere in Yoma I think. A very interesting article, thanks! I would imagine they brewed acadia confusa tree bark and syrian rue seeds. Shanon has the following to say: Taken together, the botanical and anthropological data on the one hand, and the biblical descriptions as well as later Jewish hermeneutics on the other, are, I propose, suggestive of a biblical entheogenic connection. Ive never known anyone refer to it as “hotboxing,” but that was done every Yom Kippur, thats straight out of the Exodus. We went into the desert and he found a sakrana plant and we made a fire and brewed some up. I think hes talking about some passages in the Talmud. At the Burning Bush, covered in flames but mysteriously not consumed, there was no miracle, just a drug-induced "radical alteration in the state of consciousness of the beholder - that is, Moses". There were a lot of intricate dynamic patterns comprising of animals, plants, snakes and birds. The psychedelic substance is a drink called Ayahuasca. Admittedly, the smoking gun is not available to us. I read “Israeli Scholar Says Moses Was Tripping When He Saw the Burning Bush” and would make only one point: I never followed up on any idea (or instruction or direction, etc.) Shanon concludes that the subjective experiences of Moses – encountering “the Divine”, altered perception of time, synesthesia (‘seeing’ sounds or ‘hearing’ colours), visions of fire, serpents, light perceive as God, and entities whose faces aren’t visible – are all experiences common with the use of ayahuasca. There is no evidence that the people native to the Sinai peninsula or Southern Israel used hallucinogenic brews, even if the plants were available to make it. Shanon is perhaps most well known for his ‘Biblical entheogen hypothesis’. Hi, welcome to my blog. At other times I felt like I was in a timeless, infinite hyperspace. (Its been a while since ive read through them). The account of the Children of Israel hearing God while camped at Mount Sinai is about a mass drug-taking event - giving a whole new explanation for the reported "cloud of smoke" that settled on the mountain. In Shanon's opinion, the Tree of Knowledge in the Garden of Eden offered something far more tempting than an apple. Dr Shanon's hypothesis contains what I feel is a vital clue that may help to shed light on my very bizarre experience, and vice versa. Rabbis in Israel and the UK are largely ignoring Shanon's theories, and those who have spoken out have been dismissive. Now I really regret not finding out more about it from the people who gave it to me. He also claims that ayahuasca users have a “shining” appearance after their psychedelic journey, just as Moses did. Shanon’s hypothesis (which to be fair he admits is speculative) is fascinating, and perhaps may even be vindicated in the future. "The Bible is trying to convey a very profound event. This is the idea that Moses, the founder and patriarch of the Jewish religion, was under the influence of a hallucinogenic drug during several key events that would define Judaism. The Bible is essentially a collection of stories, allegories and testimonies which have been passed down through word of mouth and then written down by various, unknown authors. They were a kind of heavy torpor of the mind, combined with a total loss of body coordination and balance, such that I injured myself badly whilst on it. One story that stands out to me is one of Moses and the burning bush. They were a traditional community, living in tents, who had a deep connection with nature, had hundreds of ingenious uses for the plants of the desert, and seemed to have a spiritual approach to life. It continued for many hours, I couldnt say exactly, but I guess it was at least twelve hours. The story of Moses’ life, as described in the Bible, does not necessarily point to a real historical figure called ‘Moses’. In the philosophy journal Time and Mind, Benny Shanon states that key events of the Old Testament are actually records of visions by ancient Israelites high on hallucinogens. Your experience with drinking the tea the first time is a true Dmt experience. Its use by contemporary bedouins living in a very traditional way would suggest that the ingestion of this may be the continuation of a tradition stretching back to antiquity? I met "GOD" on Dmt and had truly a spiritual experience. These are all pieces of evidence which point to the use of hallucinogenic substances; however, in Judaism, there is none of this evidence. So … Moses’ acid trips were far more productive (and impactful to an entire race) than at least mine. And when Moses climbed Sinai and received the Ten Commandments and the Bible, he was tripping. Once a year on the day of atonement they would do what we call today “hot boxing” where the high priest would close the curtains, and stand there inhaling in the incense filled room. In 2002 he wrote Antipodes of the Mind, in which he details the effects of ayahuasca, as well as recounting his several hundred trips with the hallucinogenic brew. The high priest did make this ketoret offering to God in a secluded room. "It seems logical that …

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